Monday, November 12, 2012

Dr. Paul Connett in Wichita, Kansas

Huge fluoride victory in Wichita: Voters put their foot down and say no to the water supply chemical additive

Monday, November 12, 2012

"...The next time somebody tries to tell you that there is no scientific evidence proving that fluoride chemicals are harmful to human health, simply point them to a new study review recently published in the Institute of Environmental Health Sciences journal Environmental Health Perspectives that shows, for something like the 25th time now, that fluoride damages brain development and leads to significantly lower IQ levels in humans," writes Ethan Huff for Natural News.

The study review, citing researchers from Harvard and China, noted there was "strong indications" that exposure to fluoride - for young, developing children in particular - can lead to improper cognitive and brain development.

"[O]ur results support the possibility of adverse effects of fluoride exposures on children's neurodevelopment," wrote Anna Choi, a research scientist at Harvard, and her colleagues in their report. "Fluoride readily crosses the placenta. Fluoride exposure to the developing brain, which is much more susceptible to injury caused by toxicants than is the mature brain, may possibly lead to damage of a permanent nature."

Paul Connett, Ph.D., director of the Fluoride Action Network, pointed out that dozens of prior studies essentially reached similar conclusions.

'I don't trust the water'

"This is the 24th study that has found this association, but this study is stronger than the rest because the authors have controlled for key confounding variables and in addition to correlating lowered IQ with levels of fluoride in the water, the authors found a correlation between lowered IQ and fluoride levels in children's blood. This brings us closer to a cause and effect relationship between fluoride exposure and brain damage in children," he said.

"What is also striking is that the levels of the fluoride in the community where the lowered IQs were recorded were lower than the EPA's so-called 'safe' drinking water standard for fluoride of 4 ppm and far too close for comfort to the levels used in artificial fluoridation programs (0.7 - 1.2 ppm)," he added.

But none of this hard data mattered much to the fluoride pushers in Wichita. There, pro-fluoridation group Wichitans for Health Teeth tried to compound the issue and muddy the waters.

Fortunately; however, most voters saw through the smokescreen.

"I pushed no, because it can mess up your teeth," LaGina Walker, 34, told the Wichita Eagle. "And I don't trust the water, period."

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